rough luxe interior

Top Design Trends for 2016 – Part 2

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rough luxe interiorIn our last post we talked about some of the interior design trends for 2016. Here is part 2 with some additional trends.

Rough Luxe.  Add depth and texture to your interiors with products that add instant age to your interiors.  But slow down on the industrial look.  It’s been around awhile and saturated every coffee house in America.  This one may have run its course, but adding texture almost always adds interest.

Retro Tech.  Remember when TV’s were integrated into the furniture?  No – I can’t say that I distinctly remember them either, but just take a look back at TV’s from the 50’s in their own custom cabinets.  The hard edge of modern electronics is getting a softer touch with the latest devices that become part of the furniture.

Seamless Functionality.  Home is not what it used to be.  Remember that living room you were never allowed into?  We don’t want to live that way anymore, and as our spaces become smaller, we don’t have extra rooms that can stand to go unused.  Today’s furniture needs to be able to adapt to numerous different activities.  Think of floating beds with an integrated desk and shelf area on the back side.  Induction charging stations are gradually being integrated into furniture and lighting designs.  IKEA just introduced a series of lamps, bedside tables and desks that are able to wirelessly charge any portable electronic devices that are placed on top of them.  How cool is that!  No more tangle of cords all over the bedside table.

70’s inspired.  The fashion industry has been loving the relaxed free spirited nature of that era, and where fashion goes, so follows interiors.  Take a look at the new CB2 line by Lenny Kravitz inspired by the 1970’s New York club culture.

What else might be a hit in 2016?

Black Metals – Think past your back yard and outdoor furniture here, and we’re not talking the raw industrial look.  Black metals are quiet, but can pack a design impact.  We see it appearing as simple hardware, bathroom fixtures and even flatware, but I personally love it pared with more refined woods (not the industrial look) and glass.

Rounded Furniture – think soft rather than hard edges that soften hard materials like stone.  Touch is an essential part of design, so look for pieces that compel you to run your hands along their shape.

Old -World Ornamentation – Contemporary/modern lines are here to stay but mixing them with period furnishings and details creates warm eclectic spaces with a lot more interest.  Add Grandma’s antique chairs around your new modern dining table.  You can soften the austere lines of modern upholstery with cording, or add fringe to your pillows and gorgeous tassels to your drapery.

Mexican Mid-Century Modernism – In the quest to recreate the set of “Mad Men”, Mid-century modern has become ubiquitous, but we’ve missed out on some of the more interesting variants of the style like Mexican Mid-Century modernism where the clean lines of American and European midcentury modern are often paired with a mix of material – wood, metal and stone.  I’ve never been a big fan of any space done entirely in one design style and it’s time to end the full court press on mid-century.  If it’s a look you love, think about integrating a piece or two into your interiors and looking further afield than what you find in every furniture store in America.

What’s out?  What you don’t like or doesn’t work for your lifestyle!  If you like to be on trend, generally speaking you’ll know what’s out by what’s available everywhere at every price point.

What to do when you can’t figure it out for yourself or are afraid of investing in the wrong piece?  Call an interior designer who has the knowledge, skill and experience to make it happen!  RJohnston Interiors specializes in helping our clients create rooms they find hard to leave.  Spaces that suit their unique aesthetic and lifestyle.

Email us at info@rjohnstoninteriordesign.com or give us a call at 661-678-0034.

AUTHOR - Brian Stevens

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